American Politics Graduate Student Workshop

The American Politics Graduate Student Workshop is supported by CSAP and provides a forum for Yale Ph.D. students focusing on American politics to present their work for peer review in an informal setting.

The workshop usually meets on selected Tuesdays from 12:00-1:15 p.m.  Workshops are being held in a hybrid format with presentations being held both in person and on Zoom.

To join the group and receive regular email announcements for this series, please contact the Graduate Student Organizer, Tylir Fowler.

Schedule 2021-2022

DATE SPEAKER & TITLE
OCT 8*
FRIDAY
Annabelle Hutchinson, Political Science (2022)
Presentation of Data Results
OCT 12 Amanda Weiss, Political Science (2026)
“The Capacity of Unsupervised Machine Learning to Detect Racial Bias in Text Data: A Study with News Coverage of Mass Shootings”
NOV 2 Ramon Garibaldo Valdez, Political Science (2022)
“The Birth and Development of Migrant Defense Organizations”
NOV 9 Daniel Goldstein, Political Science (2022)
Practice Job Talk
NOV 16 Gwen Prowse, Political Science and African American Studies (2021)
DEC 7 Jack Greenberg, Political Science (2024)
“Theories of Capital: Presidential Prioritization in the Modern Era”
FEB 15 Trevor Incerti, Political Science (2023)
“Combatting Capture in Local Politics: Evidence from Eight Field Experiments”
MAR 1 Gwen Prowse and Jennifer Wu, Political Science (2021 and 2022)
“The Effect of Context on Priming Stereotypes in Audit Experiments” (Joint work)
MAR 15

Natalie Hernandez, Political Science (2026)
“Campaign Donations During #Me Too”

Nick Ottone, Political Science (2026)
“Delegation of Recruitment: An Experiment on Movement Participation”

APR 5 Amanda Weiss, Political Science (2026)
“Federalism as a Natural Experiment? Statistical Power in Difference-in-Difference with U.S. States”
APR 19 Kristian V. Frederiksen, Political Science (2022)
“Does Democratic Vulnerability Make Citizens Punish Undemocratic Behavior?”
APR 26 Daniel Goldstein, Political Science (2022)
“Social Norms and Voting for Democracy”